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In the Intermediate Boogie Woogie Piano lesson you'll learn this slick blues piano riff, along with a Boogie Woogie left hand bass line and New Orleans style straight eighth-note rhythm. The bass line includes the I-IV-V chord progression of F7, Bb7, and C7, and is followed by a comping element in the right hand.

The lesson then covers two closely related riffs to practice, along with a tutorial on how they fit over the chord changes.

The lesson ends with a demonstration of combining the left hand bass line with the riffs and playing them together. Finally, another bass line that is more of a swing rhythm is introduced.

Now, as you practice this riff, it's important to pay attention to the timing of each note. This is especially important because the right hand riff is played over the left hand bass line, which is in a different rhythmic feel.

As you may recall, the bass line is a straight eighth note feel, while the right hand riff is played in a swung eighth note feel. So it's important to practice playing these two elements together until they are locked in and sound tight.

Sheet Music

Here is the sheet music for the first riff:

Blues Piano Riff

One way to do this is to use a metronome set to a slower tempo, and practice playing the bass line with your left hand and the right hand riff on top of it. Once you feel comfortable with the timing and rhythm of both elements, you can gradually increase the tempo to a faster pace.

Once you have mastered the first riff, it's time to move on to the second riff. The second riff is very similar to the first, but with a slightly different pattern of notes.

Again, it's important to pay attention to the timing of each note and practice playing it in sync with the left hand bass line.

Where To Go From Here

If you want to learn more about blues piano and boogie woogie, we are running a special on our three most popular Boogie Woogie Piano Courses.

Once you have mastered both riffs, you can start experimenting with different combinations of riffs and bass lines. This is where the real fun begins!

By using different combinations of riffs and bass lines, you can create a virtually unlimited number of boogie woogie solos, each with its own unique sound and feel.

To take your boogie woogie playing to the next level, it's important to continue practicing and mastering new techniques and patterns.

There are many other riffs and bass lines that you can learn, and as you master them, you can start incorporating them into your playing.

In addition to practicing on your own, it's also a good idea to seek out other musicians to play with.

Playing with other musicians can help you develop your timing, rhythm, and overall musicianship. It can also be a lot of fun!

In conclusion, boogie woogie is a fun and exciting style of music that has been around for nearly a century. By learning and mastering new techniques and patterns, you can take your boogie woogie playing to the next level and create your own unique sound and style. So keep practicing, keep experimenting, and most importantly, keep having fun!

If you're a jazz or blues piano player, then you know the importance of being able to improvise and come up with your own unique phrases on the spot. However, even the most seasoned players can hit a creative roadblock from time to time, which is why having a collection of licks at your disposal can be incredibly useful.

In this lesson, we'll go over 10 different jazz and blues licks that you can add to your arsenal. Licks are short, catchy phrases that can be used as a starting point for improvisation or as a way to add some spice to your playing. The licks we'll cover here can be used on dominant or minor chords, and can be transposed to different keys to fit any tune you're playing.

The first lick we'll cover is a four-note phrase that works well on a C minor 7 chord. The right hand fingering is 4-3-2-1-2, and the left hand can play a simple pattern of alternating bass notes. To get the most out of this lick, it's best to break it up into two patterns and practice them separately. Vocalizing the pattern as you play can also help with memorization.

Another variation of this lick is to use it over a C7 chord. This can create a bluesy sound that works well on a shuffle rhythm. The left hand can use a simple walking bass line, and the right hand can play the same pattern as before. This lick can also be used on an F7 chord by simply moving the pattern up a perfect fourth.

The second lick we'll cover is a classic blues lick that works well on a dominant 7 chord. The right hand fingering is 5-3-2-1, and the left hand can play a simple walking bass line. This lick is based on the minor pentatonic scale and can be transposed to different keys easily.

The third lick is a more complex phrase that works well on a minor 7 chord. The right hand fingering is 4-2-1-2-4-2, and the left hand can play a simple walking bass line. This lick can create a jazzy sound that's perfect for ballads or slower tunes.

The fourth lick is another classic blues phrase that's based on the major pentatonic scale. The right hand fingering is 5-2-1, and the left hand can play a simple walking bass line. This lick works well on a dominant 7 chord and can be transposed to different keys easily.

The fifth lick is a more advanced phrase that works well on a minor 7 chord. The right hand fingering is 5-4-2-1-2-5-4, and the left hand can play a simple walking bass line. This lick can be a bit challenging to play at first, but once you get it down, it can create a beautiful, jazzy sound.

The sixth lick is a simple, yet effective phrase that works well on a dominant 7 chord. The right hand fingering is 4-3-1, and the left hand can play a simple walking bass line. This lick can create a catchy, upbeat sound that's perfect for fast-paced tunes.

The seventh lick is a jazzy phrase that works well on a minor 7 chord. The right hand fingering is 5-4-2-1-2-4-2, and the left hand can play a simple walking bass line. This lick can be a bit challenging to play at first, but once you get it down, it can create a beautiful, sophisticated sound.

Boogie woogie piano is a style of music that has its roots in the blues and jazz. It's a high-energy style that's characterized by a fast, rhythmic left-hand bassline and a syncopated right-hand melody. If you're new to boogie woogie, it can be a bit daunting to try to learn the fundamentals of this style. In this article, we'll break down some of the key elements of boogie woogie and show you how to establish a strong groove.

The Chord Structure

Boogie woogie draws heavily from the blues, and the chord structure of boogie woogie is based on the 12-bar blues. The three chords that make up the basic structure are the one chord (C7 in the key of C), the four chord (F7), and the five chord (G7). To establish a strong foundation, it's important to practice playing these chords in different inversions to help your hand move more fluidly between them.

The Left-Hand Bassline

The left-hand bassline is one of the defining features of boogie woogie. It's a fast, rhythmic pattern that's played in eighth notes, often referred to as "eight to the bar." To get started, practice a simple bassline that follows the 12-bar blues structure. You can then build on this pattern by exploring different left-hand baselines that add more complexity and variation.

The Right-Hand Melody

The right-hand melody is where you can really get creative and show off your musicality. Practice playing different chords in different inversions to get comfortable with the different shapes and patterns. Once you're comfortable with the chord shapes, you can start to experiment with different melodies and riffs. Try transposing the riffs to different keys to develop your ear and your ability to play in different keys.

Establishing the Groove

Once you've got a handle on the chord structure, the left-hand bassline, and the right-hand melody, it's time to start working on establishing a strong groove. To do this, it's important to practice with a metronome. Start by setting the metronome to a moderate tempo and practice playing the left-hand bassline in time with the metronome. Then add in the right-hand melody, making sure to keep everything in time with the metronome.

As you become more comfortable with playing both hands together, you can start to experiment with different rhythms and accents to create a more dynamic and interesting groove. Use the metronome to practice playing with different rhythms and try playing around with accenting different notes to create a more syncopated feel.

Conclusion

Boogie woogie is a fun and exciting style of music that's great for pianists of all levels. By breaking down the fundamentals of boogie woogie and focusing on establishing a strong groove, you'll be well on your way to mastering this style. Remember to practice with a metronome, explore different left-hand baselines and right-hand melodies, and have fun! With practice and patience, you'll be able to develop your skills and become a confident and accomplished boogie woogie pianist.

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